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Rocks

We all know that the rock is right. Locals everywhere! They and the mountains and canyons you can not help. We sipped, we sat on them, and we poured them out of our deals. However, to correct a definite definition … this is not something we all will be doing.

Granodiorite

Granodiorite  is a phaneritic-textured intrusive igneous rock similar to granite, but containing more plagioclase feldspar than orthoclase feldspar. According to the QAPF diagram, granodiorite has a greater than 20% quartz by volume, and between 65% to 90% of the feldspar is plagioclase. A greater amount of plagioclase would designate the rock as tonalite.

Andesite

This volcanic rock is named after the Andes Mountains. Intermediate in silica content, it is usually gray in color and may be fine-grained or porphyritic. Andesite is the volcanic equivalent of diorite. It consists of the plagioclase feldspar minerals andesine and oligoclase, together with one or more dark

Gabbro

Medium or coarse grained rocks, gabbros Dark green pyroxene in principle (augite and smaller orthopyroxene amounts plus white or green colored plagioclase and black, millimeter sized grains of magnetite and / or ilmenite.

Basalt

Basalt is the most common rock on Earth’s surface. Specimens are black in color and weather to dark green or brown. Basalt is rich in iron and magnesium and is mainly composed of olivine, pyroxene, and plagioclase. Most specimens are compact, fine-grained, and glassy. They can also be porphyritic, with phenocrysts of olivine, augite, or plagioclase. Holes left by gas bubbles can give basalt a coarsely porous texture.